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Yo! Just a place to reblog interesting stuff XD look around, I guess~ :3

fililikilili:

yo but can we talk about the difference between before and after he meets hinata?


blameaspartame:

"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood …"

blameaspartame:

"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood …"


asinglegarbanzobeanonitaliantile:

me as a lawyer: kk that was rude . 


yellfang:

party-at-the-tardis:

shavingryansprivates:

why the fuck is every nursery rhyme about people dying

  • the london bridge is falling down and probably crushing pedestrians
  • ring around the rosie pockets full of posie ashes ashes we all get obliterated by the black plague
  • it’s raining it’s pouring the old man is snoring he bumped his head and fucking died

and fucking died

humpty dumpty committed suicide

jack fell down a hill and cracked his skull

A BABY FELL OUT A TREE


ghdos:

themochagoddess:

nanodash:

scienceyoucanlove:

These condoms include Vivagel, a new antiviral compound that disables 99.9% of HIV, herpes, and other sexually transmitted viruses:http://bit.ly/1ne3B9V
from Science Alert

Discuss.
Additional, slightly more detailed, article (x). It uses nanotech!

*orders box even though I never have sex..just in case*

Wow.

ghdos:

themochagoddess:

nanodash:

scienceyoucanlove:

These condoms include Vivagel, a new antiviral compound that disables 99.9% of HIV, herpes, and other sexually transmitted viruses:http://bit.ly/1ne3B9V

from Science Alert

Discuss.

Additional, slightly more detailed, article (x). It uses nanotech!

*orders box even though I never have sex..just in case*

Wow.


huntyjpg:

pantskit:

I JSUT FUCKING FOUND THE ORIGINAL ARTIST OF GOTTA GO FAST

image

I WAS ON GODDAMN WAYBACK MACHINE ON SONIC CENTRAL AND THIS IS LITERALLY IT

POSTED AUGUST 2004

THE BIRTH OF A LEGEND

image

r u telling me this meme is 10 years old???? is this the oldest meme ever???? what is the oldest meme ever?????


Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair.

Melissa Harris-Perry

This is also referred to as The Just World Fallacy. If the world is “good and just,” then bad things must only happen to people who “deserved it or caused it.” Except the world is not good and just. And despite individual people choosing to be good and/or just, structures, institutions and systems remain corrupt overall. Primarily through the media is the idea that bad only happens to those who deserve suffering conveyed. Add this to the manifestations of oppression based on gender, race, class, nationality, citizenship, sexual orientation, size, etc. and things like rape culture for example, thrive. And even ideologies that appear “harmless” to some people like prosperity gospel, positivity culture, the law of attraction and American exceptionalism are based on ignoring systemic inequality and focusing on exceptional cases. They stand firm in this particular fallacy.

See, it requires quite a bit from a person to be willing to challenge the world as is. It is psychologically, emotionally and intellectually easier to victim blame. It also helps people protect their psyches from the thought that something bad could happen to them or worse, that they are the causes of those bad things happening to others.

Still…it’s unacceptable. Victim blaming = unacceptable. The right thing to do is listen and support victims/survivors of anything and the oppressed of any form of oppression and work to deconstruct the structures, institutions and systems that make it possible. On an individual level, it requires accountability.

(via gradientlair)


oldfilmsflicker:

itsovr9001:

oldfilmsflicker:

itsovr9001:

oldfilmsflicker:

Infographic: Women Directors in the Studio System | Women and Hollywood

You can’t help statistics if more women don’t go into the film industry.

yes because women not going into the film industry is the problem. NOT. women can train and train and train and fight for jobs, but if NO ONE HIRES THEM, then it’s a moot point.
But also, you are a 15 year old self-proclaimed “anti-feminist,” so you have no idea how the world works AT ALL. have fun continuing to be un-educated about the systematic oppression of women, which by the way also affects boys like yourself, and adding to the problem when you get older instead of working to change things like all the women who do the research to get the numbers out there to maybe get the men in the big offices to see that there is a problem that needs to change. 
Or continue playing video games and masturbating and eating cheetos like most useless 15 year old boys.

Wow, yea um I will but right now I want to talk about this…
•How many women are actually striving to be directors? I can’t really imagine it be that high if they aren’t making that many movies.•How many women are trying to get a movie released? If the statistics are low for this then they’ll be low for the stats above•Are these movies any good? If they aren’t they obviously won’t be accepted to be made.•Are these women constantly being said “no” to simply because they are women? I think if women were being denied access to director positions in creating movies it would be all over the news and I would have heard about this.•are you counting women that are the sole producers in the picture above or does this count for mutual partnership?
All these things affect your data

here’s a really great website that might help you educate yourself: http://womenintvfilm.sdsu.edu/
but to answer your questions directly:
50% of film school graduates are women, but in the last 30 years women have continually only been 12% or less of working directors - mostly in the independent and documentary fields where they are often also the producers. In the big six studios, like it shows above, they are usually only about 4% if that.
the stats above are mostly about women working within the big six studios - which is where most of the big budget, widely seen films are made. if they aren’t hired, they don’t have a film “trying to get released.” if they are working independently, they still have to find financing and the sad reality is that most big financing (aka those “executive producers” and other unknown people who give money to have films made but we generally don’t know much about them) are still not willing to back a film directed by a woman. micro-finance and kickstarter have helped when it comes to indies and docs, but even smaller budgeted mainstream films have trouble finding financing when a woman is the director. that site I linked above has A LOT of research backing all of those claims up.
it doesn’t matter if the movies are “any good.” women deserve the chance to make “bad” films as much as men do. equality has nothing to do with so-called quality.
this one is so naive I don’t even no how to address it. since you claim to be “anti-feminist,” I’m going to assume you don’t actually believe in the boy’s club that is Hollywood, but I suggest you read Lexi Alexander’s beautifully written essay to get an insider’s perspective on this. 
most people are hired in Hollywood as independent contractors, so the labor laws are different than they are in almost every other industry in the united states. we have affirmative action in most private business sectors and in the government, but the way most studios/film companies work, they can and do get around these laws. 
I’m not even sure what you’re asking here, but women only make up about 18% of producers, directors, executive producers, writers, cinematographers and editors. You can learn more about how often and by often I mean not often women are considered for these roles here: http://www.wmm.com/resources/film_facts.shtml
I also suggest you read up all the research produced by the Geena Davis Institute
Lastly, I’ll address this by saying it is a chicken-egg scenario where men have been in charge of the industry since its inception (with very few exceptions), mostly because when this industry began women were not allowed to work outside the home - until 1940, 26 states had laws banning women from working - by 1956 only 5% of women were managers or executives of any kind, so there isn’t a history of women being able to do the job - because they have been prohibited by laws created by men - then are not given a chance to prove they can do it because they haven’t proven they can do it. much like when someone first applies for a job and can’t get one because they need experience first, but if they can’t get hired they can’t get experience. this is how the industry has kept going in loops and loops for decades. also, because the industry was mostly studios - that didn’t hire women, there were only two women directors who ever worked in that system until the 1970s. by then, you had a few women in the system and a handful of women applying to film school. in the 1980s, we had the rise of independent cinema and that helped immensely to get women a boost. and some of those directors would then get hired by studios, but if they didn’t get a hit, they didn’t get another chance. this is not the case for men. I can’t find the link right now, but there was a great article right after Captain America 2 came out detailing how often men who make shitty movies get hired again, but women who have movies that bomb rarely do. so to sum things up, it’s always been an uneven playing field, and even though women (finally) have as many players willing to play as the men, not as many of them are getting to start and show their skills. 

oldfilmsflicker:

itsovr9001:

oldfilmsflicker:

itsovr9001:

oldfilmsflicker:

Infographic: Women Directors in the Studio System | Women and Hollywood

You can’t help statistics if more women don’t go into the film industry.

yes because women not going into the film industry is the problem. NOT. women can train and train and train and fight for jobs, but if NO ONE HIRES THEM, then it’s a moot point.

But also, you are a 15 year old self-proclaimed “anti-feminist,” so you have no idea how the world works AT ALL. have fun continuing to be un-educated about the systematic oppression of women, which by the way also affects boys like yourself, and adding to the problem when you get older instead of working to change things like all the women who do the research to get the numbers out there to maybe get the men in the big offices to see that there is a problem that needs to change. 

Or continue playing video games and masturbating and eating cheetos like most useless 15 year old boys.

Wow, yea um I will but right now I want to talk about this…

•How many women are actually striving to be directors? I can’t really imagine it be that high if they aren’t making that many movies.
•How many women are trying to get a movie released? If the statistics are low for this then they’ll be low for the stats above
•Are these movies any good? If they aren’t they obviously won’t be accepted to be made.
•Are these women constantly being said “no” to simply because they are women? I think if women were being denied access to director positions in creating movies it would be all over the news and I would have heard about this.
•are you counting women that are the sole producers in the picture above or does this count for mutual partnership?

All these things affect your data

here’s a really great website that might help you educate yourself: http://womenintvfilm.sdsu.edu/

but to answer your questions directly:

  • 50% of film school graduates are women, but in the last 30 years women have continually only been 12% or less of working directors - mostly in the independent and documentary fields where they are often also the producers. In the big six studios, like it shows above, they are usually only about 4% if that.
  • the stats above are mostly about women working within the big six studios - which is where most of the big budget, widely seen films are made. if they aren’t hired, they don’t have a film “trying to get released.” if they are working independently, they still have to find financing and the sad reality is that most big financing (aka those “executive producers” and other unknown people who give money to have films made but we generally don’t know much about them) are still not willing to back a film directed by a woman. micro-finance and kickstarter have helped when it comes to indies and docs, but even smaller budgeted mainstream films have trouble finding financing when a woman is the director. that site I linked above has A LOT of research backing all of those claims up.
  • it doesn’t matter if the movies are “any good.” women deserve the chance to make “bad” films as much as men do. equality has nothing to do with so-called quality.
  • this one is so naive I don’t even no how to address it. since you claim to be “anti-feminist,” I’m going to assume you don’t actually believe in the boy’s club that is Hollywood, but I suggest you read Lexi Alexander’s beautifully written essay to get an insider’s perspective on this. 
  • most people are hired in Hollywood as independent contractors, so the labor laws are different than they are in almost every other industry in the united states. we have affirmative action in most private business sectors and in the government, but the way most studios/film companies work, they can and do get around these laws. 
  • I’m not even sure what you’re asking here, but women only make up about 18% of producers, directors, executive producers, writers, cinematographers and editors. You can learn more about how often and by often I mean not often women are considered for these roles here: http://www.wmm.com/resources/film_facts.shtml
  • I also suggest you read up all the research produced by the Geena Davis Institute
  • Lastly, I’ll address this by saying it is a chicken-egg scenario where men have been in charge of the industry since its inception (with very few exceptions), mostly because when this industry began women were not allowed to work outside the home - until 1940, 26 states had laws banning women from working - by 1956 only 5% of women were managers or executives of any kind, so there isn’t a history of women being able to do the job - because they have been prohibited by laws created by men - then are not given a chance to prove they can do it because they haven’t proven they can do it. much like when someone first applies for a job and can’t get one because they need experience first, but if they can’t get hired they can’t get experience. this is how the industry has kept going in loops and loops for decades. also, because the industry was mostly studios - that didn’t hire women, there were only two women directors who ever worked in that system until the 1970s. by then, you had a few women in the system and a handful of women applying to film school. in the 1980s, we had the rise of independent cinema and that helped immensely to get women a boost. and some of those directors would then get hired by studios, but if they didn’t get a hit, they didn’t get another chance. this is not the case for men. I can’t find the link right now, but there was a great article right after Captain America 2 came out detailing how often men who make shitty movies get hired again, but women who have movies that bomb rarely do. so to sum things up, it’s always been an uneven playing field, and even though women (finally) have as many players willing to play as the men, not as many of them are getting to start and show their skills. 

yayasmeen:

Hey you guys, so Ms. Kaljo reached out to me on twitter about a predicament she seems to be stuck in. So I’m asking for a favor from all of my followers to help a fellow American hijabi sister out, and sign/spread this petition! It only takes less than thirty seconds to do it!

“Hi, everyone! My name is Indira Kaljo, and I am a 26-year-old professional basketball player. I started playing basketball in America at the age of nine after my family was forced to leave our home in war-torn Bosnia when my grandparents were murdered for being Muslim. My love for the game has allowed me the chance to get an education at Tulane University and to play professional basketball overseas.

I recently decided to wear a hijab full-time because I am so profoundly in touch with my faith at this point in my life. Unfortunately, I became very disheartened after learning that the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) bans the usage of head covering during competition.

I worked my entire life - and overcame incredible odds - to pursue my dream of playing professional basketball. Now FIBA says that I have to choose between my dream and my faith - a faith my grandparents died for. I find this policy to be incredibly discriminatory, and I started this petition to ask FIBA to remove its ban of headgear during games.

There are many talented players worldwide who have been unfairly denied the right to play in any FIBA competition. They’re also being denied employment opportunities. Take my friend Bilqis Abdul-Qaadir, the first female basketball player in NCAA history to wear a hijab. She’s an outstanding player, but she may never play basketball overseas due to this rule. It’s heartbreaking for me because she’s just another victim of this policy.

I have witnessed sport’s awesome power to transcend barriers, but FIBA wants to keep them up in this case. If I’m not allowed to wear a hijab, why are some players allowed to display tattoos of their faiths without discrepancy? Look, I want FIBA to follow FIFA’s lead here. FIFA had a two-year provisional period allowing for head covering in 2012 then ended its ban altogether in March. Why is FIBA so far behind in doing the right thing here?…”


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